Tasmania

Australia's island State is known as "Tassie" to the locals and it's that kind of laidback attitude that makes this place such a welcome departure from the more heavily-populated mainland. Tasmania is a true paradise of nature and breathtaking landscapes.

Separated from mainland Australia by the 240 km stretch of Bass Strait, Tasmania is a land apart – a place of wild and beautiful landscapes; friendly, welcoming people; a pleasant, temperate climate; wonderful wine and food; a rich history; and a relaxed island lifestyle.
 
According to experienced travellers who've travelled the world in search of excellence, Tasmania has one of the world's 10 best beaches (Wineglass Bay) and the world's best little town (Strahan).

Tasmania is a land of things to do and see. On the island you can climb a remote peak, set foot on ancient shores, meet amazing animals. Duck your head in a deep, dark cave. Climb up and down a family tree. Widen your horizons on a wilderness beach. Breathe the world's freshest air in an ancient rainforest.
Tasmania is the island of rejuvenation.Tasmania Tourism Website

   

 

Major Driving Routes

We've made it easy to experience Tasmania's unique wilderness, heritage, and wine and food.  From the pristine coastline of Freycinet National Park and Wineglass Bay, to vineyards and cellar doors where you can sample cool-climate wines and luscious fresh produce, our suggested itineraries will show you the highlights of Tasmania.

Our itinerary ideas have been designed for a range of preferences - simply choose the option that suits you best.

Alternatively, plan your own itinerary.

Wine & Food

Tasmania offers wonderful opportunities to savour hand-crafted wine, beer and fresh produce, and to meet the stars of the show - the makers, chefs and growers.  Stop for lunch or dinner at one of our stunning winery restaurants.  Immerse yourself in therapeutic vineyard or river views and contemporary architecture while selecting award-winning sparkling wine, Riesling and pinot noir to match Tasmania's freshest oysters, rock lobster and venison.

Visit Salamanca Market, held every Saturday in Hobart, for an introduction to some of Tasmania's freshest produce. Rejuvenate your palate with herb vinegars, mustards, bush honeys and organic goods. Or visit one of the quality delicatessens throughout the State to taste locally produced condiments, smoked and fresh produce and luscious cheeses.

Nature & Scenic

Raft through rapids on the Picton or Franklin. Launch yourself on a cable hang-glider above Trevallyn. Paddle a sea kayak from Kettering, Coles Bay, Strahan, Hobart or Port Arthur. Explore our high country on a Great Bushwalk. Rope up on Hobart's Mt Wellington or the Launceston Gorge. Abseil a coastal cliff at Freycinet.

Slip on socks and Blundstone boots, then put your best foot forward on Tasmania's extensive network of walking tracks – or ease the pace on a heritage walking tour of our historic city streetscapes and country towns.

Trek our coasts and highlands with the sun on your back – there are dozens of Great Short Walks to enjoy, or you can take the challenge of a multi-day Great Bushwalk.

Experienced outdoor operators know the safest way to enjoy the best journeys – some of them will even carry your pack! For a list of operators, scroll to the map at the end of this page and click on the region you wish to explore.

Many of Tasmania's best walks are in national parks. National park entry fees are charged to ensure that these wonderful areas are maintained and preserved for future generations. Adventure tour professionals have all the gear, knowledge and experience – go with an expert.

Art & Culture

Tasmania's historic past is no dead and dusty creature – it's a living, breathing spirit that reaches out from its place in time, everywhere you tread. So step quietly around Port Arthur – listen to the clink of convict chains and the shuffle of feet.

Wander along Launceston's graceful Victorian streetscapes; sip a latte by the sun-warmed stone of a Salamanca warehouse; gaze over the Tamar Valley from Brady's bushranging lair.

Travel the Heritage Highway and feel echoes of the past in every bridge and cottage, their sandstone blocks chipped by convict chisels.

For a fascinating insight into the heritage of Tasmania, visit Found & Made in Tasmania, a wonderful resource containing information on shell necklaces, wood design and maritime history, as well as heritage trail itineraries and links to an array of other heritage sites.

​Beach & Coastal Encounters

Tasmania 's East Coast is a coast of contrast - sunshine and sea life, wine and wildlife, crags and beaches. It's a coast of national parks, with its quietly flowing rivers, eucalypts and Oyster Bay pines; Freycinet, bushwalkers' and sea kayakers' paradise. It's a coast of fine food and wine - as you journey on, you'll discover the flavours of the area's fresh, natural produce.

Further north is the craggy outline of Schouten Island and the graceful profile of the Freycinet Peninsula, with its sea cliffs and forests, tracks and beaches. The holiday town of Coles Bay nestles in a sheltered nook - from here it's a short walk across a saddle to the perfect half-moon of Wineglass Bay, ranked as one of the world's best beaches by US- based Outside magazine.

All along the coast, bright beaches blaze, and the distinctive blue-green East Coast sea washes the shores. Grey-green sheoak trees dapple the ground with cool shade. In the ocean beyond, whales follow ancestral migration routes, dolphins frolic and sea birds wheel on the wind. Inland, rainforest clings to steep mountain passes, and the steep rock over the rich farmlands of the Fingal Valley.

Wildlife Experiences

  • Sit quietly and observe carefully – the swirl of a swimming platypus, quoll tracks along the tideline, wombats and wallabies rustling in the bush.
  • Our oceans and coasts teem with life – seals and penguins, shearwaters and sea eagles, dolphins and whales.
  • On land or sea, specialist wildlife tours take you where you're most likely to see rare and unusual fauna.
  • In many national parks, animals are often easier to observe close-up, especially at dusk.Bring your flashlight, camera and binoculars!

Quick Facts

Category

Details

Population: 

Population 490 000 (Tasmania is an island roughly the size of West Virginia, located 240 km off the south-east corner of mainland Australia. Next stop south is Antarctica, 2000 km away.)

Climate:
  • Hobart has the nation’s second-lowest rainfall (626 mm or 24 inches) of all Australian capital cities.
  • The average summer temperature is a comfortable 21°C (70°F). Winter’s average is 12°C (52° F).
Famous For:
  • Tasmania has more than 2000 km of walking tracks and 18 national parks
  • Home of Cadbury Chocolate
  • The Tasmanian Devil
  • Tasmania’s acclaimed World Heritage area
  • Sydney to Hobart Yacht race 
  • In just about every freshwater stream, river and lake in Tasmania, there are fighting trout, waiting to rise to your well-presented fly or lure
  • Tasmania has one of the world’s 10 best beaches (Wineglass Bay, US-based Outside magazine), the world’s best little town (Strahan, Chicago Tribune) and was rated equal third, in the world, for wise land stewardship by National Geographic Traveler magazine’s Sustainable Tourism Initiative
The people:

Royals
Miss Mary Donaldson, wife of Crown Princess Frederick of Denmark, proudly hails from Tasmania.
 
Artists
Tasmanian wood design can be seen in all the major museums and galleries in Tasmania, including the Design Centre in Launceston, the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery in Hobart, the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery at Inveresk (Launceston), Burnie Regional Gallery and Devonport Art Gallery.

Musicians
Tasmania boasts one of the best small orchestras in the world and composer Peter Sculthorpe
 
Writers & Directors

  • Writer Richard Flanagan, winner of the 2002 Commonwealth Writer's Prize.
  • Writers Peter Conrad and Christopher Koch
  • Theatre Director Nigel Triffitt
  • Director John Honey

Sports Personalities born in Tasmania

  • Test Cricketers David Boon and Ricky Ponting
  • World Champion Golfer Lindy Goggin 1949
  • Tennis Champion Helen Gourlay 1946
  • Olympic Gold Medal Cyclist, Michael Grenda

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